Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Ethnobotany


SEPT 5 - OCT 12

Seymour Botanical Conservatory
in Wrights Park
316 South G Street
Tacoma, WA

The Seymour Botanical Conservatory at Wright Park is one of Tacoma’s iconic landmarks – and this September it will be the scene of a unique exhibition: “Ethnobotany: An Artists’ Study of Plants”.

Twelve featured artists in the Conservatory will venture into the world of ethnobotany through recycled material, wood, textiles, glass, metal and ceramics. Ethnobotany is the study of the relationships that have existed between primitive cultures and plants across time and throughout the world. The plant kingdom supports human life as a source of food, medicine, textiles, shelter, transportation, currency, and more. It is also a source of inspiration and ritual. In this show, artists explore ethnobotany through works that make often surprising connections between contemporary circumstances, art, botanical life and science.

Artists:
Melissa Balch
Benjamin Cobb
Barbara De Pirro
Shannon Eakins/Marc Dombrosky
Jeremy Gregory
Steve Jensen
Doug Johnston
Christopher Jordan
Lisa Kinoshita
Sabrina Knowles/Jenny Pohlman

Curator: Lisa Kinoshita
Photographer: River Meschi
Music: Alex Tapia


Thursday, July 3, 2014

Vorfreude at Method

'Metamorphosis'    Barbara De Pirro

An installation comprised of a series of opulent chrysalis forms, each representing a metamorphosis, a transformation from the humble into the exceptional. As nature creates life cell by cell, so I create these sculptures. Reclaiming hundreds of plastic bottles, I begin by hand cutting each into individual cellular shapes; stitching them together with staples until a multifaceted organic structure takes shape.

METHOD Announces Barbara De Pirro and Katie Miller in "Vorfreude."
Curated by Elisa Law and Angel Sta. Teresa

July 11 through August 23 2014

Artists' Reception: 1st Thursday August 7, 2-8pm
Artists' Talk: Thursday July 24, 5-7pm

Method Gallery
106 3rd Avenue South
Seattle, WA 

"Vorfreude," a German word meaning "the joyful anticipation of future pleasures."

"Vorfreude" explores the anticipation of growth, transformation, and renewal in life through the installations of Katie Miller and Barbara De Pirro. Miller investigates growth through video installation and performance, inviting visitors to participate in creating a series of origami boats. De Pirro examines renewal through using reclaimed materials. The resulting relationship between each installation is the process of transformation, exploring the expected potential of materials, their lifespan, and connection to their environments. The audience is linked with the exhibition as they observe its transformation and await the final event.



Barbara De Pirro's artwork has been commissioned and exhibited nationally and, is also included in many private and corporate collections. Her installations have been featured at various Museums, Sculpture Parks, Biennials, Art Centers, Galleries and Public Spaces. Additionally De Pirro's artwork has been published in multiple articles, publications and books. www.depirro.com

Katie Miller received her BFA in Sculpture from the University of Washington, and her MFA from Tyler School of Art, Temple University. Miller's sculptures, installations, and social engagement projects incorporate glass, paper, beeswax, found objects, photography, video and sound. Her work is held in private collections and has been exhibited internationally. www.millerkatie.com 

METHOD is a non-commercial exhibition space presenting art that is experimental, forward-thinking, unconventional, and predominantly based in sculpture, installation, new media, or performance. METHOD is the project of four Seattle artists identifying a need to provide a platform to engage in a dialogue about process, methodology, concepts, and materials through exceptional, exploratory, and challenging art. 

www.methodgallery.com
www.facebook.com/METHODGallery

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Bellwether: Connect


'Flora Foresta'  by Barbara De Pirro

This installation was inspired by rainforests and their incredible biodiversity and ability to influence climate patterns throughout many parts of the world.  It was created by using over 3,000 recycled plastic bags collected from the local community.  Each bag was used in its raw state; no dyes or paints were applied. They were then cut into strips and crocheted into individual plant forms.

Bellwether 2014: Connect
The 12th biennial sculpture exhibition and art walk!
Sculpture and installations at City Hall, the Downtown Park and points in between.

June 27
Reception  6-8 PM
(free parking)

Bellevue City Hall
450-110th Avenue NE, Bellevue, WA

Exhibit runs through Oct. 12


Exhibiting artists:
Theresa Batty, Nathan Braunfeld, Lisa Chen, Kate Clark, Mary Coss, Barbara De Pirro, Miquel Edwards, Alan Fulle, Elizabeth Gahan, Tom Gormally, Julia Haack, Aaron Haba, Try Hill, Junichiro Iwase, Michael Johnson, Cameron Anne Mason, Ivan McLean, Geemon Xin Meng, Carolyn Mills, Carol Milne, Allan Packer, Maria Perry, Mike Rathbun, Joseph Rossano, Connie Sabo, Andreas Salzman, Dimitra Skandali, Debbie Westergaard Tuepah, Bill Vielehr






Wednesday, June 11, 2014

ArtOutside Sculpture Invitational

'Hives'  by Barbara De Pirro

'Hives' is a site-specific installation comprised of a series of opulent forms nestled within a grouping of three trees.  As nature creates life cell by cell, so I create these sculptures.  Reclaiming hundreds of plastic bottles, I begin by hand cutting each into individual cellular shapes; stitching them together with staples until a multifaceted organic structure takes shape.

Celebrating 15 years as one of the largest art parks in the Northwest!

Summer Solstice Reception Saturday June 21

Port Angeles Fine Art Center
1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd.
Port Angeles, WA 98362

pafac@olypen.com
360-457-3532

Helping as mark this occasion are returning artists:

Alex Anderson
Anna Wiancko Chasman &  Kim Weimer
Barbara De Pirro
Claudia Lorenz
Dani La Blond
David Eisenhour
David Nechak
Deanna Pindell
Gray Lucier
Lanny Bergner
Lin McJunkin
Margie McDonald

'Hives'  by Barbara De Pirro

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Camano Island Studio Tour

'Hives'   Barbara De Pirro

Art lives on Camano Island!

If you've been wanting to visit Matzke Fine Art Gallery and Sculpture Park
plus.... check out my outdoor installations, ‘Hive & Forest Weavings’, 
the next two weekends are perfect!

#9 on the map
May 9 - 11 & May 17 & 18
10 AM to 5 PM

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Green Art: Trees, Leaves and Roots

Authored by E. Ashley Rooney and Margery Goldberg
Over 100 artists, an international mix...some familiar favorites & some new!


Since humans started creating art on the walls of caves thousands of years ago, nature was their prime subject.  The artists in this book create art about connectedness and interdependence; individuals to trees, human to human, man to nature, individuals to community and nature to life.  Trees inspire uniqueness and relevancy....

(Segment from Forward by Margery Goldberg )



Trees are our partners on this planet.  They are gorgeous, productive and long lasting.  Humans revere the majesty of trees and respect their value and incomparable contribution to our planet.
Trees can live without people, but people cannot live without trees.....

(Segment from Forward by Margery Goldberg )

Order your copy HERE


Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Meaning of Wood: Olympia


April 7- May 2
Opening Reception April 10,  6-7 PM

Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts
@ SPSCC
2011 Mottman Road SW
Olympia, WA

The Meaning of Wood Curator Statement
There are probably as many paintings, photographs and sculptures of trees as there are trees. But many trees meet fates not so frequently portrayed: harvested and shipped to other markets, conserved for biological benefit and recreation, subjected to forest fires or windstorms and so lost to the use of humans and other species, milled and turned into functional products, and so forth.
The Meaning of Wood provokes thinking beyond individual tree portraits into the process and significance of trees becoming wood. It is a paradox of our language that “woods” means a living forest and “wood” means the material of products and commerce. Our language is permeated by tree metaphors – a problem has its “roots,” software programs have “branches,” railroads have “trunk” lines, we ourselves are “stiff as boards” or we “slept like logs.”
This is not an inconsequential topic: global forests are carbon sinks, rich nations pay poor ones to retain forests for carbon sequestration, and counties in Washington still depend on timber sales to fund education and public safety. 

This invitational exhibit includes artists from all across western Washington and northern Oregon. It offers diverse media: painting, photography, printmaking, assemblages, quilting, sculpture, even a game.  It ranges from the days of the spotted owl protests to contemporary times and presents an array of social viewpoints.
Curating the exhibit has reminded me how much we treasure both “wood” and “woods.” As a society we attempt to derive both commercial and spiritual value from forests simultaneously. We can debate and disagree about what the highest and best uses of the resource are: experiences of nature? Biodiversity bank? Houses? Furniture? Objects of beauty and contemplation? Valuable export category? Or pallets and toilet paper tubes?
Our human nature responds to the rich sensory qualities of wood. Even dead, wood reminds us of life. We will never want to be without it around us.      -Suze Woolf

'Encircle'    Barbara De Pirro